Mentors Make A Difference By GS Girl

Mentors Make A Difference By GS Girl

Category : Success Stories

I’ve always been a little embarrassed about what I’d call my first real riding experience on my own. So this guy calls me up; strong, sexy voice and invited me to go on a confidence ride. I was all giggly and girly in that conversation, and if you know me that’s the last, (perhaps second last) thing I am.
I started saying prayers that this is ‘THE GUY’ and a biker to boot. Prayers answered pap! (I’d never heard the false stories about bikers then)
Anyway, he picks me up from home, we plan a route – southern bypass to Ole Sereni exit and back. The ride was pretty much okay at first. I was riding at 40 KPH with no traffic. My mentor on was either on my right or behind me. However, I started seeing the dreaded trucks coming fast on my mirrors. At this section of their journey they’re usually light and having joined the smooth bypass all they want to do is cruise! I had a trucker flashing lights and tailgating. My heart was beating faster than it had when I had my first kiss.
My mentor, bless him, was shouting at the trucker and pointing him to my L sign mpaka akatulia. Phew!
Lesson 1. It can be dangerous to drive slowly on roads with high speed limits.
Lesson 2. As mentor, you bear responsibility for your mentor albeit not at the expense of your own life
We rode on to Ole Sereni but he just went past. Alar! I had to follow. There’s this illegal turn further down at the tracks which is where he turned. I followed, or rather tried. I stalled. Maybe five times until Bodabodas on the opposite side of the road started cheering me on. I was scared of matatus, canters, trucks. Worst of all I was even scared of Vitzs.
I finally managed to turn. After all those heart stopping moments we took a break there. My mentor didn’t smirk at my turning challenge or speed. But I was challenged to increase my speed at least to 60 kph on the bypass.
Lesson 3. Don’t be in a rush to push your mentee. Let them get used to the road then encourage and challenge. Don’t expect them to do higher speeds just because you can.
Lesson 4. Debrief at every stop where possible. This allows you to correct any mistakes you see as mentor.
Lesson 5. Take it easy. Always ride your own ride and don’t push yourself to please others. That said, don’t get too comfortable in your zone. Always push yourself to be better (not faster).
Lesson 6. Don’t be afraid/ ashamed to ask for help. No one learns to walk alone.
The ride back was uneventful and I even managed 80kph. I loved that ride back!!!
And now the Mills & Boon ending……
Alas, he was not THE lGUY! But I’ll never forget him. Thanks Guy for being my first and giving me the confidence to ride.
Lesson 7. Not every guy I meet is THE ONE! Just this one guy who I might tell you about next time….😍

Love the ride and kisses.😘

😘


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